Motivational Quotes

You are going to let the fear of poverty govern your life and your reward will be that you will eat, but you will not live. -- George Bernard Shaw

Project Dreamwings

A Global Quadriplegic Challenge

Archived Articles

Member Statistics

  • Total Members 113
  • Guests Online 21
  • Members Online 0
  • Registered Today 0
  • New This Week 0
  • New This Month 0
  • Latest Member ytyhoho
Home My Accident
Accident - Page 3 PDF Print E-mail
Written by Arthur D Piercy   
Monday, 13 July 2009 10:03
Article Index
Accident
Page 2
Page 3
Page 4
All Pages

While he was reading the EP pump failure I got the second failure, a right hand fuel pump failure. This is not too serious under normal operating conditions as the engine can gravity feed. While the boss was reading the fuel pump failure procedure and I was confirming that they were done the following light on the warning panel appeared. A HYD 2 system failure.

This caused a little concern initially as the aircraft's main systems use hydraulic fluid. Undercarriage, flaps, controls, airbrakes and of course wheel brakes. After a quick and careful analysis of the situation I relaxed a little. The HYD 2 system is basically a standby system for the main HYD 1 system. All I had really lost with the HYD 2 failure was the nose-wheel steering. It could have been worse.

By now we were far enough away from the combat zone and the dangers associated with it, so I started to climb to try and conserve fuel.

The next thing that happened is that I was getting an audio warning but no visual warning when I looked at the panel. The hours of simulator training came into action - a pending OIL failure. This concerned me a little more than the rest of them. There are two critical components that use oil. The throttle and the nozzle flaps on the engine.

Flying the aircraft on the emergency throttle (electrically operated) is not easy. The throttle is very slow and unresponsive.

At this time the leader pulled in next to me to inspect for any damage. He reported that there was fuel leaking out the aircraft and that the drag chute was missing. As he said that, the 500 litre warning light came on. The fuel gauges still read 1700 litres so now which one is right. A little more pressure was applied onto little old me.

Landing a perfectly serviceable aircraft on a 7500' runway requires some work. I was going to have to do it on emergency throttle and without a drag chute - a task I felt I could handle.

I planned to land the aircraft short on a new stretch of runway that was being constructed. This would give me an additional 500' to play with on the landing roll. I got her down at the threshold but when I applied the brakes the only thing that happened was the expression on my face changed. I pulled the nose higher so that there would be some form of aerodynamic braking but this did not help. About a 1500' from the end of the runway  I applied the emergency hand brake with little effect. The arrester-bed or sandpit at the end of the runway was my next hope of stopping this machine.



Last Updated on Wednesday, 14 December 2011 23:11
 

Testimonials

This is the year! May all your desires and wishes be prosperous, successful and blessed.

I would like to Thank everyone for all the encouragement, support, motivation and belief that has been thrown in my direction over the years to date. You are all my motivators when times got tough and I felt like throwing in the towel. All it took was one positive email of encouragement to get me back on track and all fired up.

 
Free Joomla Templates: by JoomlaShack